Four Habits That Contribute to Your “Referability”

A friend of mine, Pat Hamner, teaches business graduate students. We share an interest in seeing others develop their leadership ability.

He shared an article with me where author Bob Buford reflects on the advice of a consultant, Dan Sullivan.

Sullivan says that success in the marketplace calls on developing four habits that contribute to your “referability.”

Here are the habits:

  • Show up on time.

    I get asked all the time what I wished schools taught better to students entering the work world: “Teach them to show up.” When you’re on the wrong side of someone not on time, you get a strong sense of the impact of tardiness: wasted time, squandered momentum, disrespect communicated, a hit to credibility which causes someone to question training and character. Woody Allen said, “Ninety percent of success is showing up.” Being someone who is reliable by their timeliness creates opportunity.

  • Do what you say.

    In the world you make assertions. Living a life consistent with the words you say builds trust. Living a life fulfilling the commitments you make builds a reputation of reliability.

  • Finish what you start.

    Inevitably, some checks are harder to cash. While it is easy to quit, showing the fortitude to stay a course, try again, find a way until the goal is complete makes a difference in the opportunities that come your way.

  • Say please and thank you.

    They are respectful words that communicate grace and humility. Using them garners good will.

Like so many virtues, the ability to access these habits, put them to use and have them accrue to your benefit has nothing to do with wealth, education, skill or inheritance.

Are these habits your habits?



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Posted in: Improvement, Motivation, Strategy

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